Can You Survive The Office Witch Hunt?

I was fascinated by a recent series of articles in the Huffington Post written by Dr. Janice Harper and decided to learn more about her work.  [Harper is the author of MOBBED! A SURVIVAL GUIDE TO ADULT BULLYING AND MOBBING ] Her 2010 paper, Just Us Justice, is the culmination of lessons learned from a chilling personal experience with mobbing in the workplace.   Anyone uncomfortable that she links this phenomena to lessons learned from the Holocaust should read the in-depth article, Trial by FBI Investigation.  The author details Harper’s horrific descent into what has been called an academic witch hunt.

I decided to give her a call and quickly found myself deep in conversation with a fascinating woman.  She gave me permission to re-print excerpts of Just Us Justice which include Harper’s own perspective on how to survive mobbing.  As important, she raises questions about the efficacy of laws, “zero tolerance,” and the “bully label.”

Just Us Justice

…If you are being mobbed, take an honest look at yourself and your own behaviors in fueling the aggression. Doing so does not in any way justify the violence that is being directed toward you, but just as you learn not to look a grizzly bear in the eyes if you should come across one, figure out what you are doing that is provoking your attackers. Don’t confront your attackers. Retreat, quietly document everything, but get your resume together and start applying for jobs – even if you don’t want to leave. Protect your reputation, safeguard your security and increase your options for escape. Do not accept any claims that you deserve this treatment, but do not accept the victim label, either. You have been mobbed because you have done something – however well meaning, however benign, however unintended to hurt anyone, however legal – but you have done something to trigger a violent reaction in others. The sooner you are able to identify what you have done to trigger these emotions, the sooner you can change your own behaviors and more favorably influence perceptions of you until the mob either diffuses, or you get out of their reach and into a new future…

How Survival Operates

Fighting the mob is like fighting a grizzly bear. When the bear goes after you, friends are going to run as fast as they can – away from the bear. And if you run in their direction with a grizzly hot on your trail, they will be outraged – not at the bear, but at you for putting them at risk. So what do you do once the bear gets a hold of you? Have a fair fight? Give that bear everything you’ve got? Good luck.

The more you fight a grizzly bear, and the longer you are visible and moving, the meaner that bear is going to get. What that means in an organizational setting is that you are no longer engaged in the warfare of work, but are instead facing a genocidal process. Leadership has given the signal that you are to be eliminated and it is okay to attack you, the mob has formed and the bear is coming your way. The more you fight the mob, the more force will be used to compel your elimination – regardless of how accurate, fair or even legal the claims are that are used to justify your elimination. Your anger will be treated as evidence of threatening behavior, your fear will be evidence of paranoid thinking, your confusion will be evidence of your erratic state and mental impairment, and your impaired productivity – from having your responsibilities taken away, your contributions ignored, your time invested in specious “investigations” and fighting for your job, and your emotions exhausted by the sheer weight of the battle – will become evidence that you can’t do the job. Importantly, reason – and public scrutiny – will not stop the aggression, but intensify it. The more you demonstrate that the attacks against you are wrong, illegal and just plain cruel, the more wrong, illegal and cruel they will become.

In order to survive, it may be helpful to take a lesson from those who survived the Holocaust. When the Holocaust got underway, those who fled early suffered the least and recovered the fastest. The longer a potential target remained in the shadow of the genocide, the more they suffered. Thus, the moment you discern the first scent of mobbing heading your way, lay low; if the mobbing has progressed, play dead. It may be necessary to file internal complaints to preserve potential legal claims, but the more you do, the more the aggression will intensify, so ask yourself if you really want to go that route. You may well lose your job unfairly, even illegally, and suffer grave losses as a result. But battling the grizzly bear can cost you your life.

To save it, consider these tactics:

  • The more evidence you produce to defeat your attackers’ claims and actions, the more determined they will be to get rid of you – which means finding fault any way they can. Mobbing is not a conflict over facts and reasons, but a conflict over power and emotion. Reserve the evidence for future legal claims if you must, but whatever evidence you provide, keep it to a minimum, fact based, and stripped of emotion or counter-attacks. It may be helpful to have an attorney or pragmatic friend – unassociated with the workplace – draft your complaints or responses for you to be submitted in your name, to minimize the emotion.
  • Communicate to your closest friends and colleagues at work (or wherever it is that you are being mobbed) that you want to keep them out of this and will be keeping your distance until this is over. They will be relieved, grateful to you, and have less reason to turn on you. Get your emotional support elsewhere.
  • Do not assume that if your conflict involves your status as a member of a group of people (by gender, race, ideology, whatever) that other members of the group will support you, no matter how blatant the discrimination. They will be courted by management, provided rewards, and they will be afraid. They will almost always turn against you. The exception to this rule is when the group has been established within the organization for some time and they are secure with their positions – in other words, they have critical mass. The less diversity within the organization and the more recent the diversification of the workplace, the more likely the other members of the group will declare that there is no discrimination and you are the problem.
  • Similarly, do not expect that if you file a sexual harassment action, that feminists will support you, and do not expect that if you are accused of sexual harassment, that men will support you – no matter how vocal they have been about their views on the topic. For the same reasons that those closest to you and a member of your same group are likely to turn on you, you will be alone if you file, or are subjected to, any internal investigation.
  • Do not expect that a person’s political ideology, stated values, or religion will have any bearing on how they respond to your attack. The more they are committed to a moral framework, the more strongly they will likely condemn you so that they can persuade themselves that they are acting within their moral code.
  • Beware the bully label. If you are angry, complain, or express anything negative, you can expect to be labeled a bully at some point in the mobbing process. Zero tolerance policies for bullying, sexual harassment, racism, discrimination, and workplace violence might sound like progress, but they enable an organization to justify eliminating anyone once they are accused of any of these offenses. Lay low so that you are not accused.
  • Bear in mind that the most effective accusations are those which are outlandish, and/or contrary to everything you openly believe in, a principle which Joseph Goebbels well understood when he advised Hitler that if you tell a lie big enough and often enough, people will believe it. If you openly oppose sexual abuse, you may well be accused of sexual misconduct. If you openly oppose racism, you may well be accused of making racist remarks.
  • This is because people tend to believe an accusation of such nature could not possibly be made unless there was some evidence to support it.
  • Moreover, as people are conditioned to view you adversely and be prompted by “concern” for you and to “watch for” certain signs, they will see what they are told to look for.
  • Do not expect threats of lawsuits, appearances by attorneys, internal investigations, transparency, or reporters to calm the storm. It will worsen it. If you consult an attorney, do not let your employers know. An attorney eager for a lawsuit will probably not have your best interest in mind.
  • Get out. No matter what the cost, mobbing is not something most survive. Take pro-active steps to protect your health, career and finances by finding new employment, before your reputation and your spirit are destroyed. Whatever the costs of leaving, consider your assets and preserve then. Leave before your reputation is destroyed, your finances wiped out by attorney fees, your spirit savagely attacked. When you are at war, you can win. But mobbing is not a form of warfare, it is a form of genocide, and the only way to survive genocide is to flee.
[Note: Anyone currently experiencing mobbing should always seek in-person counseling from reputable experts to determine the best way forward based on their own unique situation.]  
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79 thoughts on “Can You Survive The Office Witch Hunt?

  1. I think it would be a good thing for Occupy Wall Street to end workplace bullying. It makes offices toxic to work in and why can’t we just be good at our jobs, unharrassed by our office mates who feel threatened, so we can go home and give love and nurturing to our families. friends, do our volunteer work like coaching teams, helping raise money for important causes, you know, just saying.

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  2. I’m experiencing a kind of mob bullying but I don’t believe in just “fleeing” the situation nor do I feel I did anything to cause it. One may have to work within the unspoken rules of the game but there is a way to rise above it all. You have to keep your cool and that becomes a challenge at times. You have to be reasonable, calm and confident. Don’t let them drag you down to their level because that is what they aim for. Work towards a greater alignment with the upper management unless they are big bullies and it that case it is probably best to leave.

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  3. Workplace bullying and Mobbing are difficult for an employee to fight. Employers ignore policies and protocols, are the umpire for their own game and have huge resouces with regardsto funds to pay lawyers. If all else fails they pay out a paltry settlement with a binding gagging clause to shut the employee up forever. If one plays the employer’s game by the employer’s rules one is sure to be victimised again.

    There are some possible answers. Don’t accept a gagging clause. Don’t stop talking about what happened. Consider annonymous activism, like teling your story on an annonymous blog. Annonymous blogging is not easy. Google the subject; there is a lot to learn.

    There are some useful resources on http://www.whistlebloweraustralia.com

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  4. I would like to first, thank Beverly Peterson for featuring my work; this issue is a pressing social problem and merits discussion from a range of perspectives. Second, in regard to what Anonymous said about not accepting a gag clause in any settlement — I made it clear to my attorneys that I would not be negotiable on any stipulation that infringed on my right to free speech, or to explain the circumstances related to leaving my employment. I settled my case in a high six figure range and did not sign any gag order. Many attorneys will tell you it is standard practice; that does not mean you have to accept it.

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    • Janice, after reading this I finally feel like I am not alone. My management contract was not renewed after experiencing an investigation and mobbing. I was never even told what I was being investigated for. I look back after reading this piece, and realize I did a lot right. I kept it overall calm and just doing my job to the best of my ability. What I did not do though was leave. It appears things are working out, but the savage attack on my spirit, as you noted, has wounded me so deeply I am having trouble healing emotionally. Thanks for the piece.

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  5. Thank you for posting this paper. I have read it and re-read it many times. Each read helps me take another step toward healing and recovery. Although, I have researched and learned much mobbing and workplace bullying,Dr. Harper’s paradigm confirmed my reality. Unless someone has experienced it firsthand, there is no way to comprehend the cruelty and insidious acts perpetrated against a target. I got out. I worked for a comprehensive victim service agency that primarily served survivors of domestic violence, sexual assault and other violent crimes. Needless to say, when I realized that I was targeted I tried to explain to family, friends and others outside the workplace about the severity of the problem. Understandably, most people thought I suffered from paranoia or that I was inthe throes of a psychotic breakdown .Others advised me to “pull my self up by the bootstraps” and get on with it.” Fortunately, I knew the difference.Because of the work I do, and understanding the cycle of abuse, and the impact of crisis and trauma, especially, I created and followed through with my own professional safety plan. Ultimately, the bully was ousted. However as Dr Harper noted, the behaviors and the mindset are deeply ingrained in the culture of the agency. As the leadership team restructures,most of the remaining employees are waiting in angst. They will strike again.Now, approximately six months after my flight survival,I have no doubts that mobbing/workplace bullying mirrors gentle genocide. Again, thank you, for sharing your expertise and experience.

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  6. Pingback: Violent flash mobs, told you so…. – Keeping Sweet in Seattle

  7. Having had some experience with this lately, this was a great article and advice on how to handle this situation. I am very grateful! Thank you, Karen

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    • Sorry you had to go through this – it’s rough. Hope it eases for you and you can talk about it as something that happened in the past. I found that getting personal (in person) advice from an attorney and counselor was really helpful…

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  8. I have question for this article. If I wait until Company want kicking me out.
    Then I finally found that this is totally witch hunting. Also Many of politics involved.
    Should I bring up to attorney and fight with case of discrimination? and Even Those real problem person who have power(like owner representative, General Manager or Regional people) still give me hard time. Even I am not working at office anymore. What should I do ?
    All about money and all about they frighten that I knew true story include their graft.

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  9. I have just gone through this exact experience just as Dr. Harper describes. I did detect the behavior and retreated eventually and started looking for a new job. I was unable to find employment before I was ‘discharged’. I can find something but would have to relocate and I don’t want to do that given family situations right now. My discharge just happened in March and I have filed for UC benefits but it appears that is being contested since it seems to be ‘under investigation’. I now need to rehash “my reason I believe I was discharged” so UC can based their investigation on ‘all facts’. I searched the web and came across this post. I have 48 hours to return the form with my explanation or they will based their decision on what they have been provided. I did more searching for ways to express how I was treated because to respond to this form is kindof damning – ‘were you informed of your performance’ – The mobbing continues. I just want to move on with my future like I always was. I want to greet each day with love in my heart and be happy again.

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    • I trust that you were able to find counsel to help you to reply and more importantly that you are able to (as you state) greet each day with love in your heart. That should be all our goals. I have been able to move on and find a contentment that we all strive to find which is a belief that we can interact in a respectful way in the workplace where we spend so many hours each day. For me, it’s less about “happiness” than it is about the freedom to just be myself and have the freedom to do what it is I need to do to complete the task at hand and receive compensation. Warm cyber wishes to you.

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  10. Consider what you’re doing to provoke the attacks? That’s like asking a rape victim to consider what they could have done differently to avoid being targeted.

    Sometimes victims are just that – victims.

    I went through this at a large company, and I left. Two of the people were fired later, one was demoted. One had sexual harassment charges filed against them. And my point here is that sometimes the worst thing you can do is consider what you’ve done to provoke your attackers, because sometimes all you’ve done is to be you, and if you doubt that, then they’ve bullied you to your core.

    No, stand up for yourself. Don’t cower. Call it like it is. Believe in yourself and fight for yourself.

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    • I didn’t know about mobbing, I found the book and ordered copies. It figures that the land of the free and the brave, doesn’t have laws to protect the innocent. Read DIVIDE by matt taibbi- oppression against the poor, and a too big to fail or jail for the rich. I finally had proof of tampering/sabotage on the U.S.Postal service equipment I’m normally assigned to work on, and sent an email to the OIG 05/14/14. I filed an EEO in December and said I don’t want to sling mud, I just want 3.5 more years then I’ll leave. I know who the bullies and jerks/liars are, and it wasn’t long after they started working here, that mobbing against me started. What did I do wrong? I wasn’t a local, or a kiss-ass, or one of the crowd. I had a divorce, my sister died and I had to help care for my mom, my son was arrested, later murdered, 2 murder trials, and later equipment fell on me, that I would bet heavily was sabotaged. BUT NO LAW AGAINST MOBBING IN AMERIKA…..

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  11. I believe in fighting back regardless of how childish it is. I’ve been mobbed for 30 years and in most cases, it’s because they just don’t like the way you look.

    There are several things that can be done that puts screws in their work as well. Remember in many cases, money is all they really care about, just a thought. I like tricks on them, focus one person at a time. Make that person work hard. Make them wonder who is working on them. Head games can work both ways. Be brave, their intent is to make you quit so give ’em hell !
    \

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  12. I am glad to hear that someone was able to fight against academic mobsters and win. But I think a major reason contributing to Dr. Harper’s success is that her persecutors overstepped the mark: they accused her of a crime. Once that happens, the weight of the justice system is brought to bear, including all of the many rights of the accused. Think about it: Now her accusers had to reveal themselves, they had to disclose what she was accused of, she was allowed to see the evidence brought against her and to face her accusers in a court of law, she had a right to legal representation, and her case had to be tried before an impartial judge (and possibly jury).

    The reason mobbing is so effective is because none of these things apply. Often, the target does not know what is being said about him or her, and has no right to find out. Mobbers typically make their accusations confidentially to powerful people; administrators and academic grievance committees typically invoke confidentiality in order to avoid accountability. Targets are rarely given the opportunity to tell their sides of the story or to dispute “evidence” brought against them. Even if they are given the opportunity to file a complaint or grievance, committee hearings are closed, and the committee members can choose to ignore any evidence the target brings to bear to prove his or her innocence or victimization. Everything is done in secret. The target is often tried and convicted in the court of innuendo and gossip, and the punishment is slowly meted out until the he or she either leaves, cracks up, or commits suicide. Even if the target leaves, his or her tarnished reputation usually spreads because academia is a small and very tribal world. Targets may be turned down for jobs because of the negative things said about them by the mobbers at their home institution, and they will ever know that happened.

    Anti-mobbing legislation needs to be passed if the destruction of innocent people (and destruction of fair academic workplaces) is to be reined in. Administrators usually side with the mobbers and aid them in gagging and punishing the victim,. They will continue to do so–gleefully, I might add–as long as they face no negative repercussions for their actions. Dr. Harper is a typical example of a target: A bright and accomplished scientist and scholar who has proved her worth to her discipline and added to the body of knowledge in her field, but who didn’t fit in or was perceived as some kind of threat to the mobbers’ power or prestige. These are typically the people targeted for destruction, and their loss negatively impacts the quality and quantity of our scientific progress.

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  13. For those of you who are experiencing this right now, please listen to this advice – leave as soon as you can!! I put up with mobbing for several years and it has taken a toll on me which I hope that I will recover from. The worst part of my experience was that the bullies started telling people that I was “hearing voices” once I spoke out about it. The truth is, bullies mob the target until they look like a lunatic, then plausibly deny any wrong doing by labeling the target as “mentally ill” once the target speaks out. Mobbing can make the target appear to be “crazy” but people don’t realize the root cause of the target acting “crazy”. Mobbing induces schizophrenic-like symptoms on the target giving people the impression the target is a schizo. The real truth is that the victims suffer from hypervigilance and complex PTSD due to the trauma of mobbing. I just hope and pray more and more people become more aware of this instead of just refusing to believe that mobbing even takes place. People that mob others deserve the hell they bring on their targets.

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    • Why assume that mobbing targets can just leave? There are precious few jobs in academia, and they generally want “virgins or stars”, that is, people who are fresh out of grad school (or post doc positions) or people who are internationally famous.

      If you’ve been mobbed, your vita will be compromised. You won’t have gotten enough done to fall into the latter category because the mobbers will have made it difficult for you to get time, resources etc to build your vita, and will have so thoroughly demoralized you that you won’t be able to focus on your work. Meanwhile, the time you spent in your current position means you are no longer a “virgin”.

      People who have been mobbed often can’t just leave. There is nowhere for them to go. To advise them to “just leave” is (I’m sorry to say) useless advice. Don’t you think they would if they could? The implication is that they are choosing to remain victims rather than doing everything they can to protect themselves against impossible odds in a soul-murdering situation, and seeking every possible means of getting out without leaving behind a once-promising career.

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    • 1. Legal counsel will tell you that what they are doing is not illegal, just cruel and unethical. As a result, there is usually not sufficient grounds for a lawsuit.

      2. Therapists who live in college towns will tell you (as a colleague who is one confided in me) that they hear about this kind of brutal treatment all the time, but there is little they can do to help other than prescribe meds to manage the depression that inevitably ensues.

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    • I suggest you seek counseling from someone else if the first person doesn’t help you. There are a variety of approaches and it’s important to note that everyone does not get severe depression that lingers. Mental resilience is now something that many counselors are involved in trying to strengthen in these types of situations. The legal options that are open are different state by state.

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    • You know, what helps is hearing from other people who have gone through this and how they managed it. So I understand that you are trying to be helpful, but please stop pushing therapy onto everyone who posts here.

      For the record, one of the things that made the women’s movement powerful in the beginning (and continues to do so) is women talking to other women about their experiences. We used to call it consciousness raising, and there is enormous healing power in that.

      So please don’t stifle that by jumping in and lecturing people about getting “professional help”–especially from professionals who have no idea how to help. They used to put women who complained about housewife angst on laudenum and then valium–and labelled them neurotic–because they did NOT understand what these women were experiencing on a daily basis.

      As much as your intention is to help people by telling them to “seek professional help”, all that really ends up doing is pushing them into therapy with people who don’t understand. And I say that as someone who has professional colleagues who readily admit to that.

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    • Hi, THank you for your post. There are several Facebook groups associated with this site and others that are set up to provide the type of experience you are talking about. NoJobIsWorthThis.com is available to allow people to share their stories. One of the reasons that we often mention seeking counseling is because it is important to remember that people who are experiencing mental health issues are vulnerable and they need to seek out and speak IN PERSON to someone who can help them assess their own particular situation. That includes legal advice. You may not be aware of it but there’s a difference between sharing your experience and telling people what to do. Dispensing legal or therapeutic advice on the Internet puts a site at risk. No one target has all the answers any more than any single organization and it’s easy for a target to misinterpret what is being said and take actions that aren’t appropriate for their situation.

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    • When there are therapists who are specially trained to understand and treat workplace mobbing, then it will be a good idea to recommend it to mobbing victims.

      Therapists are trained to deal with family dynamics, and they themselves rarely have actual workplace experience because they spend all of their days in their private offices seeing patients one-on-one. Most have no idea what happens in most workplaces, nor do they have any idea how to deal with a mobbing victim.

      As I mentioned earlier, one of my colleagues confided that, as a college town therapist, he constantly hears about unimaginable psychological and emotional abuse from university employees, particularly faculty. But, as he put it, his “toolbox” is full of tools for looking at early family dynamics to “help” a victim understand why they might have “perception errors” or might “over react to situations”. He said he used to think this was the truth–that the people coming to see him had “unresolved trauma from their childhoods”–and that was why they falsely believed they were being subjected to abuse in the workplace. But after years of hearing the same kinds of stories from countless academic patients, he began doubting that credo. Now he thinks academia is a pretty poisonous place–and has gotten more poisonous in recent years. But, as he points out, he is not a union rep or a workplace mediator. His tools do NOT fit the problems he is seeing.

      So be very, very careful about going to a therapist with mobbing issues. I gave my colleague several articles on the phenomenon, for which he is very grateful. But knowing about a phenomenon and knowing how to treat victims of it are two different things.

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    • Wow! that’s a really narrow view of what therapy has to offer. I’m not here to dispute what your friend feels but I and many others have thankfully found help from those counselors out there who do understand the dilemma of workplace bullying. It’s always best to “shop around” when seeking therapy.

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    • I wonder why I’ve stoodfast against this abuse, maybe because I believe in myself and my values of decency. My twin brother is mentally retarded, he was choked on the imbilical cord. I didn’t know until I was an adult and my sister told my mom that I had to know, what had happened. Growing up under the stares of others pointing at your brother, helps toughen you up I suppose.

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  14. I, too, am experiencing a bully/mobbing situation in a public school where I am a counselor. I am fighting two blinding problems with my eyes and am on immunosuppressant therapy. I have been screamed at, smacked, labeled, excluded. You name it. I will have to leave this environment. I have received the worst treatment in my view (other colleagues may differ). It is hard for me to heal physically b/c of the daily stress from working with and for incompetent bullies.

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    • I am truly sorry to hear about your situation. You really should find out what your rights are because “smacked” in the U.S. is over the line of what is legal. Dr. Janice Harper has been writing some great articles in Psychology Today about Mobbing you may want to check out.

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    • Unfortunately, HR is there for management and to pretcot the org, not employees. I’m sure many HR professionals do care, and work to create a healthy equitable environment. But HR most often sides with a bully supervisor regardless of facts or plausibility. They listen and pretend to care, then act quickly to work w/ mgmt to squeeze out the complainer (usually a hard-working, loyal, but bullied target) as if this is somehow a way to avoid legal action; I still don’t understand that rationale.

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  15. I am at the end of my total beat down, I am isolated , alone , soon to be with out the ability to earn an income my once good reputation is clearly erased now labeled as a trouble maker and someone who is difficult to get along with in the work place. The latest was a lateral co-worker who kept calling my supervisor in to conflict resolutions he always sided with her. I started to think not again, turns out they had an affair 3 years ago and she had his kid, He’s a psychiatrist.Really? my god really? Its like I have battered spouse syndrome always seeking out situations where I have no chance at success. I’m tired of it . I’m sick of wallowing in the BS. Truth is in order to leave this hell hole I need to come to terms with getting out of a house I owe 214K on that’s worth 120. I ‘m so done with this shit.

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    • I am truly saddened to read your comment and pray that you are seeking counseling to ensure that you are not alone through this. Get advice on your rights from an attorney and stay strong.

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  16. Its crazy isn’t it – reading these comments I so know the feelings first hand of all here sharing their pain, dejetection and rejection….. Been there and back there now… In the middle of the witch hunt…. I so hate it. Being watched at work, overseen for days, with a collegue writing a report on everything I do – if I blink its in there. So over it…Being called to question on my actions, abilities to keep well documented reports timely, precise, accurate – I do all that. Still another competency assessment awaits in the coming days, and another – to determine whether I get to keep my job. Im so tired because I haven’t slept properly in weeks, and fear being late or leaving too early. When you get to the place of ‘this is not worth it’ – you know its time to start looking elsewhere… and yet.. I know I deserve to keep this job, but wonder why I would want to stay in an environment that obviously doesn’t want me. The rejection is so painful, and soul destroying. You’ll only be reading this if your in a similar boat but ya know that person who smiles and says hello to you, in the street, at work where ever… that’s me… please say hello back, I am a good person. Be kind to each other. Life is way too short for this HEARTACHE

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    • You have really eloquently described the deep and conflicting emotional response to being bullied or mobbed that targets struggle with — stay or go? I’m so sorry that you had to come to this understanding through personal experience. Warm wishes to you as you move through this.

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  17. Thanks:- Update; I resigned and know it was the right decision but I miss ‘being busy’, I’ve wallowed for a week now and decided today I Make My Days Better, it s up to me and no one else to just Do It. Boy as you get older its less appealing, but more important than before for your own self esteem

    Stay Positive People – Life Is Like A Cup Of Tea…..Its How You Make IT
    x

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  18. Hello there! This is my first visit to your blog!
    We are a team of volunteers and starting a new project in a community in the same niche.
    Your blog provided us useful information to work on.
    You have done a extraordinary job!

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  19. What triggered the intense abuse I sustained over many years until abused out the door was that I was doing “too good of a job” and “worked too hard” – something outside my control given I had no control over what I was asked to do. aka jealousy. Can’t get away from that unless you compromise your values and purposely do a bad job?

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  20. But… What if you didn’t “get out” in a timely manner and save yourself? What then? Do nothing? Don’t tell your story? Don’t we still have the right to FIGHT because it was WRONG? Tell me how to effectively bring the issue to the attention of the right people in the company/organization because surely the WHOLE place is not that way!

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    • Many researchers say that one of the aspects of targets who are deeply impacted by abuse and those that aren’t can be that there is a much greater impact on those who want to address the “injustice” of a situation. We all have the right to fight against wrongdoing but the real question is how high is the emotional, physical and financial cost of that battle? Which battles we pick in life is something that each of us must struggle with and sometimes it’s worth it and sometimes it’s not. Each of us faces challenges that are unique in terms of the work environment and our co-workers we are dealing with. External and internal pressures differ from place to place so it’s difficult for anyone to say who in your company/organization may or may not be sympathetic to your concerns. There are several decent books on the topic ( Catherine Mattice, Patricia Barnes’ and Janice Harper’s books have been reviewed on this blog ) that may help you. A lawyer or counselor may have advice for you that is specific for your situation…

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  21. I’ve been through mobbing three times in my life (once as a child, twice as an adult) and have read so very much about the topic. This article nails it — Mobbing is indeed genocide if it has progressed to the point that you have no support. The faster you can get out, the less emotional and reputation damage you will suffer.
    That said, however, my three go-rounds had an educative value (only wish it had happened the first time…) One, I learned to recognize mobbing much sooner in the process; two, I learned the difference between real and assumed support systems; three, I learned how to buy time by fighting back dirty; and four, I learned to constantly cultivate contingency plans.

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    • Sorry to hear about the multiple experiences. I agree that we need to teach children and adults better skills to (a) recognize what they are going through and (b) coping skills. Cultivating contingency plans is KEY!

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  22. OlderButWiser, this last time it was just one mobber rather than a gang, though she was definitely in the process of forming up a mob. And what I did was set her up, draw her out into the open, and attack myself. Luckily, I had the Big Boss (BB, OB’s boss with whom I work directly) as an ally and he had a spine, otherwise it wouldn’t have worked and he would have caved right into the mobber’s little mob or would have refused to intervene. Also, I did not take action until I was so sick of the treatment that I was ready to walk away from it.
    Mobber had gotten her old pal the Office Boss (OB) on board, as I found out the one time I permitted OB to schedule a meeting to “settle things” between my mobber and me. Mobber told OB a pack of lies — typical — and OB gave them credence.
    Basically, once I saw that my mobber’s tactics had become clear and repetitive, I told BB what I had been going through for 5 years and how it was problematizing our work (mine for BB), but emphasized that I did not want him to intervene — that I wanted to smooth things out myself and that I was confident that I could do so.
    Then at one point my mobber went all out, made a huge scene in a public place spewing lies in front of half the organization. When she started right back in again with her underhanded mobbing after vacation, I initiated stage 1: I essentially thumbed my nose at her in the manner I carried out my work, cutting her out of my work procedures and communicating with her in ways I knew would make her madder and madder…which they did. True to pattern, she waited until the critical moment in BB’s and my production cycle and work-bombed and phone-bombed me (a tactic aimed to show that I was not capable of the workload or, alternately, to make me collapse under the workload). But by then then all it took was showing BB my computer screen and telling him “She’s doing it again and I can hardly get things done for you.” One phone call and down came OB on me, oh now we have got to have another meeting…This time, though, I flatly refused to meet with her and Mobber (I’ve been through 3 such meetings in my lifetime, I call them “wolf circles” and after the last one I decided I would never put myself through another one again). So OB met with me alone, I wore a tape recorder just in case things got unpleasant, and (assuming she might be wearing one too) I refused to take the blame for anything. I pushed everything back and pointed it firmly at Mobber, listed all the attacks she had made, and informing OB that “You have a problem and it’s not me — It’s her.” OB then suggested mediation, which I refused — however, (and here’s where stage 2 begins) I offered to draw up a document with the mediator that detailed my perspective and that, after the mediator’s suggestions for improvement, could be sent to Mobber, with her then doing the same for me.
    Given the ok on that, I then listed point- by-point the ways in which mobber had attacked — for example, “It is unproductive when I am called at 11:15pm on Saturday nights and told by Mobber that I must complete work with her then and there on the phone, and, when I refuse, being told that I am a vain, selfish bitch who is out to ruin the organization.” etc. Once the list was finished, I sent it to the mediator, and CCd it to OB…and to BB.
    Mediator and I did work through the document, changing the negatives into positives (“I appreciate having my free time respected, particularly the hours between 8pm until 7am, when childcare is necessarily my priority. I appreciate it when work is discussed civilly, without resorting to hyperbole, vulgarity and name-calling.” etc. However, when it was all finished and approved, I called OB and said that since Mobber seemed to have gotten herself under control (I had had not a single iota of trouble in 2 weeks), I thought it would be best to refrain from sending the text to Mobber. She agreed — grudgingly.
    What did I accomplish? I got everything out in the open through direct accusation and by doing so made it impossible for Mobber to further continue her habits without risking being seen as still at it. I felt that it was a process of shifting from the role of victim (though I was still being victimized) to the role pf perpetrator — I became pro-active in defining the dynamics of the aggression. Though what I did was not very nice, it felt good to be in control and even better, after what I have been through at the hands of other mobs, to stop it for once in my life and walk away from it alive (I did take another job offer 5 months after this incident, of my own volition).

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  23. Hi all,
    I am a survivor of several mobbing attacks in different workplaces. From the outset can I say that if an organisation has a culture of mobbing or bullying, it is a reflection of the poor leadership of that organisation and that includes at least from the CEO to all levels of middle management. Bullying is something that can be fought and beaten as it is by definition inflicted by a single perpetrator, so one on one is a ‘fairer’ fight. Mobbing on the other hand is something that is nigh on impossible to beat as it is not a fair fight with attacks coming from multiple directions and often from directions that cannot be seen or defined. The only hope you have of beating this is if the ‘mob’ is of a smaller number and not supported by upper management. There is then the possibility that the issue can be dealt with in a fair and effective manner. But from my experience mobbing is usually condoned by upper management as a way of dealing with perceived ‘trouble makers’. Deemed trouble makers because they may be high achievers, be individual, or are different from the group in some way such as they don’t think hunting is ‘fun’ or they treat everyone in the workplace equally. I stayed far too long in the first mobbing attack on me and the second at a different workplace (in the same ‘small’ town). I tried to fight it but I was never going to win over these people once they had set their sights on me. Mobbing within these companies was systematic and ingrained and impossible to beat. I have since encountered two more organisations that use mobbing as a management tactic and I did not stay once I realized this. I was not mobbed but did not wait around to be mobbed. I suffered a mental breakdown after I left the first of these two organisations believing I was unable to cope with people. My breakdown was because I was suffering from PTSD from the earlier sustained attacks. After that I worked for an organisation where bullying and mobbing were not condoned and I thrived! What I have learnt from this is you need to choose the organisation you work for very carefully. So my message is clear. Choose your workplace well, for the sake of your mental health.

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  24. Dr. Harper,
    You are wrong in saying a target has to first see what they are doing to provoke it. I hate to say this, but it’s evident now why you got 6 figures and were published in this website. Being a doctor and saying that about poor victims is unethical and demeaning. Tell me doc, what did you do to provoke your BULLY? Or did you have this all planned? How dare you madam I will never read your books.

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    • Actually the Namies of the Workplace Bullying Institute also suggest self reflection in order to heal and begin the recovery process. Most advocates currently compare workplace bullying to domestic violence. One of the first things that happens in recovery from domestic abuse — and this is universally accepted as therapeutic in the recovery process — is a self assessment of the victim/target’s role. It is in no way meant as a way to place blame on the victim. Rather, it is meant as a way of empowering the victim so that they do not end up in a similar situation ever again and they can develop new skills to help protect themselves. Self analysis questions are — when did this relationship become dangerous and why didn’t I act sooner to protect myself and my children. What can I learn from this. The battering partner is far from exonerated in this process. One of the reasons her article was published on this website because she has the strong support of the leading expert in the field of mobbing — who himself was a victim of mobbing in academia. Best of luck in your own recovery and I hope that you find solace in the research of those who are seeking solutions.

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  25. My heart aches for all here who have gone or are going thru this hell!! Now I know why people go postal!! This shit is a friggin epidemic mess.I also went thru this crap, I was devalued, called a friggin idiot, a stupid moron, and many more. Am I hurt?, heck yeah, however, I’m mostly just so angry, I cant see straight. This crap has got to stop, When I was younger, I wanted to take on the world, in my forties now, not so much. Just want to work, get paid and go home to my grand babies. Looks as though that ain’t gonna happen…so now what?? So sick and tired, of being sick and tired over some other scum of the earth people. Why does this happen? Do people really get a kick out of seeing others suffer? I just don’t get it!!! What I’m looking for is the WHY. If I really understood that, then I would know how to fight it. Just doing nothing,but a bunch of talk, is like being married to a narcissistic sociopath. ( oh,and yes, I have been there done that!!)

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  26. I am a Human Resources Consultant with over 20 years of experience in health care and University environments in Canada. I have been on disability since January 2013 after suffering more than two years of mobbing at the University where I am currently employed. In my circumstance the mob is comprised of my former Director and several colleagues, are people I once trusted and respected as colleagues, and in some cases friends. My consistently positive and successful work performance is very well documented yet none of this seems to matter anymore. I made a mistake by becoming ill for 10 weeks in 2010. My illness followed my miscarriage and severe family stress. This provided the opportunity for the mob to form. I was advised while on leave that I was no longer part of my team. I was forced to apologize for my medical absence, my Director disclosed my medical diagnosis to my team against my wishes, I was subjected to more than 20 degrading meetings related to the absence my 2010 illness had on my team (although my position was backfilled), I was denied a bonus I had earned, passed over for the promotional opportunity I had earned (no explanation provided), and was ostracized, ridiculed and shunned by my team members. HR leadership did nothing to help, despite my repeated requests. I am a shell of who I once was. Although British Columbia has enacted laws against workplace bullying, the process is belittling and exhausting and is still ongoing today, more than a year and a half after my PTSD/Severe Adjustment Disorder diagnosis and departure from my workplace. How could this have happened in a professional Human Resources Department at a University? I ask myself that question every single day. It is still unthinkable to me. I can’t believe this is happening. Day and night I relive it all over and over again, even though I have been in treatment for PTSD since the spring of 2013. People are people I suppose, no matter what the work environment. My heart goes out to every one of you who has also suffered workplace bullying or mobbing.

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    • I am so saddened to read your story and send you warm hugs as you work through it all. I wish that the laws slowly being enacted could truly protect our dignity and health in the workplace. Thank you so much for sharing your story.

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    • Thank you all so much for your kind words of support. It truly does help to know there are caring people who actually understand what this experience is like (although I wish it weren’t so..)

      On Sat, Jun 21, 2014 at 6:19 PM, OUR BULLY PULPIT wrote:

      > Pete commented: “That’s just horrible. I hope you find happiness.” >

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    • It happens everywhere. Wherever groups of people form, be it home, social or workplace. The only fundamental explanation I can come up with for all this is that the Palaeolithic dynamics of survival written into our DNA are still active no matter how much we think we have evolved from that, and conditioning we have had.
      I work in a very famous children’s hospital in London, attached to a very high-achieving London university. My job is both clinical and academic; I am a researcher in oncology. I am surrounded by incredibly intelligent people, by academic standards. I adore my job and view it as a privilege to be given the opportunity to try and improve the care and treatment of our children. I work very hard indeed, and pretty much all the time. Yet, guess why I found your site?!…..

      These attacks were instantly launched by the perpetrators, the second they saw me; I don’t have one mob after me but several independent-of-each other mobs. Lucky me! What did I/am I doing wrong?….
      I agree with the earlier post, that it can just be the way one looks….
      Being female is the first issue in the world of scientific research. Being female and blonde is a complete no no. Being female, blonde and curvy…. well, I should just be at home shouldn’t I?! and then, the final sin….being female, blonde, curvy and having a brain that works and being really good at my job ….. that just = witch.

      One mob leader is female (physical appearance opposite to me)…. my job involved taking on some of the work she didn’t have time to do.
      Another mob leader is male, single, Muslim (I am openly of Christian origin I guess best describes me). For some reason he has always taken offence to everything I say, don’t say, do, don’t do; I can never win, so I try and do nothing but I have to work with him and I sit next to him, so this is very difficult. He constantly demands I speak with him in private about issues he has with me. I tried once, over a year ago, couldn’t comment on anything he was accusing me of as I hadn’t done any of those things and have refused to engage in a discussion with him since. He has now upped his game tremendously.
      Both parties continuously fabricate and twist things that I have said or done complaining to superiors about me all the time. Thankfully with regard to the first mob leader, my superiors are supportive of me and beginning a formal complaints procedure on my behalf…. which I’m sure will only make matters worse between her and myself.
      With the second, male mob leader, he has been whipping up an army of other disgruntled, single, or married and unhappy, frustrated, bitter males who routinely stand around my desk being very loud, pushing into my chair and being generally intimidating; one of them who is married and who I have been fighting off sexual advances from for the whole time I have been there. And our incredibly clever, brilliant clinical/academic leads think they are such nice people because they deliver everything they say with a bit of a laugh and a smile and calm demeanour.
      I am exhausted.
      I am broken.
      I have lost my spirit, soul, hopes, enthusiasms.
      I cannot take on another fight.
      I do not want to leave, I love my job. My research is making a little difference to the treatment of the kids in our beds, right now.
      Please please don’t advise me to seek counselling or legal advice. I need tools to fight this in real time, quickly, right here and now.

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    • I wish I would have reached out like you are doing now. I have already commented in this thread months ago, but it was too late. I did end up settling with my employer and sort of re-write history in my personnel file, so there was some closure. But the worst thing of all is that my spirit was broken and I am still recovering.

      So here are some real-time ideas that I wish someone had told me.

      The author mentions leaving early on when a witch hunt starts and uses the holocaust example to explain what happens to those who stay. In the future, if I run into such a situation again, I very well may leave as soon as possible. But at this time, looking back, I wish someone had given me some real-time tools on how to maintain my dignity.

      1. Ask yourself a tough question:

      If I leave now voluntarily, what are the consequences? Write them down and reflect on what you have written down. Pros and Cons. This may be all you need to bring resolution to the situation.

      2. If you decide to go on fighting this, remember that HR represents management, not you. As much as they smile and act friendly, and as much as the actual HR rep actually cares, the employer (upper management) takes care of itself first. This is a very real thing, so don’t allow yourself to believe otherwise.

      3. Document everything to the extent possible. Use email for time and date purposes when its reasonable to do so. Print and maintain a copy at home. Don’t use it for direct legal purposes or in legal conversations with your employer though, unless an attorney advises you. This can backfire if it is used without legal advice (its the company’s property).

      4. If someone avoids putting things down in writing, it can help at times to follow up the conversation with an email that says something like: “Thank you for talking with me today. My understanding from our conversation is that…..” Just be careful when and how you use this. It’s an extremely powerful tool, just think about consequences of using it before you use it. It shouldn’t be overused, in my opinion. People can absolutely freak out when its used.

      5. Get personal counseling throughout this. This will help you make sound decisions. It will also document emotional distress if you end of suing at some point.

      6. In the USA we have Family Medical Leave. If you have something similar, use it. It’s another way of documenting emotional or medical harm toward you later.

      7. Never ever ever do anything that confirms your accusers are right. This can happen when you are stressed. Another reason to get personal counseling through this. They are waiting for you to confirm allegations, assuming this is happening to you.

      Finally, you might tell yourself later that you are crazy for not getting an attorney now. There are just too many legal issues that you are not aware of. I highly recommend you get an attorney. Not doing so could lead to someone destroying your reputation and your career.

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  27. Thank you for the article! I was forced out of my job by the heads of a large company due to a misunderstanding. I was mobbed, isolated (employees were told they would be fired if they spoke to me), and gang stalked 24/7, and so I left. I thought it would stop after I left the company, but apparently it is not enough that I left the company, because the torture continues. I am being gang stalked. They managed to even recruit neighbors and friends. I can only assume that they are trying to force me out of my field. I love my new job (I’ve been here for 6 months now), but as soon as I leave the stalking and harassment continues. There is currently no help for this type of torture because it is almost impossible to prove. I have been enduring this for 2 1/2 years now!

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    • Dear Q If they are still stalking you after you left the job, then I would suggest spending every free minute actively searching for anyone in law enforcement who may care to help you. You need a badge to confront them.

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  28. I forgot to ask, in your article you say, “But mobbing is not a form of warfare, it is a form of genocide, and the only way to survive genocide is to flee.” I left my former employer, but I am still being gang stalked by them,. Do you think it is in my best interest to leave my chosen field because these evil people want to force me out?

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  29. I would like to add my contribution to this debate, as a person who has suffered workplace bullying on many occasions, from jealous colleague who stole my work, to work place managers who for some reasons always saw me as a threat. Having read this article I recognise the stages of mobbing, with the initial “declaration of war” to everyone abandoning you and joining with the manager. I believe the best advice when facing this situation is to leave. Find another job as soon as you can. Only stay and fight if that job is particularly special to you, and be prepared for the fight of your life. Prepare your emotions and your psychological health which is going to take a big hit. Prepare your legal strategies, prepare for a long haul fight, with the prospect of little recompense at the end. Sometimes to bully leaves to a higher paid job, having gotten away with his bullying, or you will not gain any compensation due to high legal fees etc. So the question is: is your job really worth a big chunk of your life? If it isn’t just go. It will be much better for you in the long run. When faced with injustices they cannot right successful people move on. They don’t stay in a disadvantageous situation being a sacrificial lamb for the sakes of it. They keep moving until they the right place to be successful.

    Liked by 2 people

    • I particularly like what you say at the end. The most tragic circumstance is when there really is no other job to move onto and you are forced to choose between either staying or leaving to face financial destitution for you and your family.

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  30. You described to the T what happened to me. I tried to escape but I was unable to find another job before it happened. I did not document what they were doing. Human behaviour can be quite cruel. Unfortunately, malevolent managers have no problem using people as pawns to save their own reputation and further their ambitions. I endured mobbing for 9 months and I did everything that I could do positively in my job. In the end I got a “shit” sandwich and a severance package. The next day my boss slipped into my old job to protect herself from being fired as a poor manager. It took 3 years and over 100 interviews to land my next full time position that I’m starting next month. So in hindsight … if you get even a small whiff of a witch hunt, realize immediately that you are not working for the right company and find a new one. Take my word for it.

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  31. This article described exactly what happened to me. I worked for several years for a company. One of my colleagues had had a relationship with our boss prior to my joining the company. She was hostile with me from the first day and not once did she cooperate with me. I tried to be professional with her without sucking up to her. I complained to our boss about her attitude and provided examples of her horrible behavior but he never addressed the problem. I remained confident throughout but had to put up with the reality that my colleague was favored by our boss with the best and most prestigious and high profile work. I asked to be given the same opportunities and indicated to our boss that this failure to address the problem and the favoritism facilitated the bullying toward me. He continued to do it and even had dinner at the same table as her at our off site events in front of everyone. This sent the message that her behavior toward me was sanctioned and made things worse. Bit by bit in the last couple of years I noticed that a few of the people in our department started to be unfriendly with me. This led to one other woman going on a witch hunt and complained to our boss about me for anything she could possibly complain about, even made some things up. I ended up requesting that a workplace assessment be done to deal with these issues. I was told very little about the results of the assessment other than that people interviewed said that the problems revolved around me. I ended up being fired. I hired the best employment lawyer in the city who negotiated an excellent departure package for me. It is, nevertheless very hard to stomach. I agree that a person confronted with this type of bullying should leave as soon as possible because bullying is like a cancer that spreads and kills you and you can’t win.

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    • Sorry, but you knew the place was shady when you found out your boss had an affair with the employee….you should had known better than to go to him and complain to him about her. As soon as you saw the dynamic, you should have left….but leaving a job should not always be the first option…in your case, you should have left as soon as you knew this woman had a relationship with your superior. Its common sense, that’s how the boat rows. Take what you have learned and let it serve you in the future…this also goes for “family and good friendships” in the workplace where the superior is biased. Thats rampant in the work force.

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  32. I got a job in a small town, working for the council. The boss didn’t like me from the start, I think he even badmouthed me before I started as I sensed some resentment even asking “what has gone on here before” Boss is a narssicist, spent time on dating websites at work and then liked to brag about his mistresses at smoko.(he is married with two kids) I heard stories about previous people they said ” we had to get rid of them” I got another job but the boss went to a conference in that town and they withdrew their offer. They didn’t like me because I am better than them, better training better experience simple as that. I documented everything, reported stuff to union, went to work councillor which is what saved me in the end. They ganged up on me and made some complaints. Weak manager and weak HR, got a payout and got to have my say about what a toxic workplace it is. I’ve been feeling ok, hurt, disgusted etc which is understandable but what is really upsetting me now is they are advertising my job to “work in a true team environment” WTF!

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  33. Pingback: It’s not bullying. It’s scapegoating! Trainer’s Manual | endscapegoating

  34. I found this extremely cowardly…you can’t run every time you are faced with bullies. My God, you will be ran off from every job. That’s how competitive the work force is. You go to the bear and face them. They will lie, you contradict their lies…and you do it with as much force as they do to attack you behind your back. You dont involve others, until they see you standing up against the grizzly. If the bear still attacks you…you keep notes of all the work that comes up missing, or their tactics, even the gossip…and bring it straight to the supervisor…if that doesnt work…go to HR…if that doesnt work…go above all their heads. If nothing gets done after this…then you are probably not working for a very good company and need to find a new job…right before you fill the bears gas tank up with water.

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  35. I also have a personal story to share…which put me in the same position as many of you. I just got my medical license and my first job working in the nursing field. My first night, I was being laughed at with left field comments by a big guy who sat around watching me. He was another employee who had the same title as me. I wasn’t even off the job training, before he pinned my coworkers against me behind my back and started sexually harassing me. He made it where he was the only person I could go to for help, and in my line of work…you need all the help you can get. I was totally alone and set up a few times for which I was called to the office, where I was locked in with my supervisor…who I gave a full statement to, as she wrote…told her of the bullying, set up and above all….the sexual harassment and threats. As I sat in the office with my supervisor telling her these things, and it quickly became apparent that she was the wife of my harasser. Another supervisor was called in and got in my face and started calling me a liar. I laughed…and walked out. I called the next day and went over all their heads to the main office and repeated my story, put in my resignation and quit. Six months later, my harasser was on the news…he had lost his job and was looking for employment….he was accused and set up for sexual harassment by the other employees. lol

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  36. Wow thank you all for the reality check. I wondered what was happening to me. A good worker, excellent employee with years of public service. Now I know…..financially I cannot afford to quit but my physical and mental health are suffering. I am going to be strong and step out of the crazy mobbing and regain my health and self worth. Wish my luck. The last straw was saying I am never at work. The person who comes in early, works while eating lunch and stays late to finish the job. I blame upper management for allowing it to happen to others before me. I thought I was different …..lol

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  37. I couldn’t even finish reading the article because this perspective seems to feed the big bad bear…and there are times when you need to stand up for the truth…especially when there are very few jobs out there and the big bad bear has already torn off the heads of many others!!! Sometimes in private sector jobs you can leave…but with the ever expanding world wide web…well…there is nowhere to run!!!

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  38. I have currently resigned from my job due to bullying that has now turned into mobbing this has been going on for 3 long months. I have been in this job for nearly 10 years. I went off on sick leave for 2 weeks where I wad too scared to leave the house but I somehow managed to get my CV together and on my 2nd day back got a job interview then a 2nd interview and got the job! I was ok for a few days but am slowly getting worn down by their antics again which seems to be a pattern Im worried that now they know I am leaving they wont hold back. I already have no support and know that they all think I am being too sensitive. people that I considered to be great friends have now given up on me. I cant stomach going back but I only have 7 days of my notice period to go. I need help to build up my self confidence I really need help. I am currently going to counselling organised through this workplace but dont think she is helping and this week will be my last session of the 3 work has paid for.

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    • the best thing to do in a concentration camp is- LEAVE IT. the american work place is’nt what it used to be. Your mean and nasty coworkers are winners because they are cruel lousy inhuman pieces of shit who have organized themselves against you with a wink of approval from management. the department of justice is NOT. fukushima and global warming will finish off all of us and alot sooner than you think. think of your health and sanity.

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  39. DONT! QUIT! Hang in there everyone. These last posts made about leaving the job is only a “subliminal message” to certain targets to do just that. The doctor has her fortune so why should she care about anyone else. What an evil doer. This doctor wants bullied victims to throw in the towel as if there is no God. Pray and God will open doors for you where windows were shut. Do not give up or give in. God has you there for a reason. Believe in yourselves and live on. Your presence most likely means very much at your job and your bully and there co-horts cant stand it. The olive branch has long been known as a symbol of victory, peace and purity of heart; and the dove came back to Noah, in the evening, and behold, in her mouth was a freshly plucked olive leaf. So Noah knew that the waters had subsided.
    Psalm 52:8
    But as for me, I am like a green olive tree in the house of God; I trust in the loving kindness of God forever and ever.

    Trust in God! not in some human weak doctor that has given in to fame and fortune.

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  40. I worked in a Local Govt position within an organisation full of narcissists and psychopathic personalities and was mobbed. I did a good job with little to no training, had my work sabotaged, hand balled jobs the higher ups were paid for but didn’t feel like doing, bad mouthed, ridiculed, left out of team lunches to answer phones, ignored, received an award for a job which the supervisor took for herself. Months of hell later, I had documented everything, kept every email, photos, dates, times & presented it to HR. The ring leader was promoted and I quit with no investigation ever undertaken.
    The doctor diagnosed me with depression, prescribed antidepressants which sent me off the planet and referred me to a psychiatrist for my “problems”. I refused to take the tablets after the second day and the psych couldn’t remember from one session to the next what we had discussed. I went to a friend for reiki treatments. It took about 6 sessions to feel almost normal again, I honestly can’t recommmend reiki highly enough.
    My theory is that one psychopath obtains an authorative position, hires like minded psychopaths and intimidates semi normal co workers into joining in their repulsive behaviour. Anyone who doesn’t join in is ganged up on, mobbed out and replaced with a junior psychopath.
    Workplaces need to undertake mandatory psychiatric assessments along with the mandatory medical examinations prior to employment contracts being issued to make sure these pure evil beings are never allowed to permeate businesses or other humans souls in a workplace. Ever.

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  41. I wished the laws were strict regarding work place bullies, I say this because I was recently fired as a result of three bullies who mobbed me, lied, and used [redacted] Ethic clause against me.

    Here is my story…..

    I worked in an office that belonged to a different department, mistake number one, they had a different supervisor that no one in their department liked so it was extremely awkward for me from the very beginning.
    I mentioned all of this to my supervisor, she in turn told me not to get caught up in the office drama, to separate myself, mistake number two, I should have taken it serious and approached HR with the “I hate so and so” comments or just recorded them since there were always three of them and one of me.
    Which leads me to my last issue, there was always two to three of them when they were talking about male employees in a sexual manner or how they disliked their boss, it was never a situation with someone I trusted or someone who would say something. I could not approach HR, if I did it would be my word against those two or three people which in the end lead to my termination. Yes, they lied when I told my boss the truth, I am a terrible liar, she asked me if someone had said something and I came clean….the others in turn said it was me who said it.

    Thank you Rocky [redacted] for your lack of morals!

    Liked by 1 person

  42. This is exactly what happened to me almost detail by detail. Only I did fight and it has been hard. I have had some success in a remand from the Ninth circuit against the union and awaiting a trial against the USPS. I agree that if you are going to fight that you should be aware of the cost and time involved. There were people that stood against the holocaust and helped others and no one looks at those people’s endeavors as useless. I am willing to share my knowledge and experience in the EEOC, Federal Court and Reasonable accommodation. [redacted[

    Like

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