Mobbing expert says What Killed Kevin is “an extraordinarily important documentary”

Ken Westhues is generally regarded as the global expert on the topic of Mobbing. He weighed in publicly this week on our documentary about workplace bullying, What Killed Kevin.

“…Read Harper’s review here of Beverly Peterson’s powerful documentary, What Killed Kevin?, a case study of the difference between focusing on alleged workplace bullies and grappling instead with the complexities of group dynamics…” “…an extraordinarily important documentary…”

Westhues recently brough his treasure trove of a website up to date — http://www.kwesthues.com/JaniceHarper.html

FORTUNE Article Asks “Why Are Workplace Anti-Bullying Bills Failing?

Fortune/CNN Money’s article by Jonathon A. Segal, “Hard to Define: Even Harder To Ban,” clearly recognizes the severity and devastating impact of workplace bullying on the American worker and their employers. It’s been over ten years and 25 states since the first version of the Healthy Workplace Bill was introduced and still no takers. Segal sees a message in this #fail. Continue reading

15 Years Later: Harassment Laws Still Broken

March 8, 1998 the Washington Post published an Op-Ed in response to a Supreme Court decision, Oncale v. Sundowner. Sadly, the essence of this Op-Ed still resonates today: “Predicating harassment suits on discrimination is also something of a mismatch; what bothers people about abusive workplace conduct, after all, is not the fact that it may be discriminatory but that it is abusive in the first place… Congress should decouple Continue reading

Justice Ginsburg Stands Up For Abused Employees

English: Ruth Bader Ginsburg, Associate Justic...

It’s hard for targets of workplace bullying to prove their hostile work environment is a clear case of discrimination — bullying by definition falls outside of the protections of Title VII — but some plaintiffs still managed to win by proving they were fired or demoted in retaliation for filing a claim. Today’s Supreme Court decision just made that harder and a second “get out of jail free” card was awarded to businesses when SCOTUS narrowed the definition of whether that jerk harassing you is “technically” your supervisor. In what the Huffington Post called a “rare move,” Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg told the court: “Both decisions dilute the strength of Title VII in ways Congress could not have intended,” said Ginsburg, who then called on Congress to change the law to overturn the court.” In Vance v Ball Ginsburg wrote: Continue reading