FORTUNE Article Asks “Why Are Workplace Anti-Bullying Bills Failing?

Fortune/CNN Money’s article by Jonathon A. Segal, “Hard to Define: Even Harder To Ban,” clearly recognizes the severity and devastating impact of workplace bullying on the American worker and their employers. It’s been over ten years and 25 states since the first version of the Healthy Workplace Bill was introduced and still no takers. Segal sees a message in this #fail. Continue reading

Suing A Bully Boss

[This is Part I of an excerpt from Janice Harper's new book, Mobbed! A Survival Guide to Adult Bullying and Mobbing. Harper advises against suing -- but if you find yourself in that situation she offers advice that may well help you understand what's happening to you. Part II will continue with how to prepare. These are just excerpts, her book goes into much greater detail on internal & external investigations, coping tactics, new ways to understand what's happening to you and much much more. Let us know if it helped you... ] Continue reading

Using Workplace Violence Policies To Stop Workplace Bullying

Public Employees: Connecticut

edith pragueSeveral years ago Connecticut State Senator Edith Prague wanted to pass workplace bullying legislation for public employees. The opposition argued that it was already covered under workplace violence policies and a study was requested to determine if it was indeed included. I was filming Prague’s support of the Healthy Workplace Bill at the time and remember well that she was passionate about the topic and surprised to learn that the handbook policies put in place after a tragic workplace 1998 shooting nearly 10 years earlier actually did address bullying behavior. The 2008 report concluded that: Continue reading

Your Manager Is a Bully (but You Aren’t Helpless)

Browsing through the digital libray I found this great  NY Times Career Couch column from way back in 2007 and it deserves another read especially if you’re starting to wonder if that boss of yours is a bully:

Q. Your boss regularly berates you in department meetings, and the behavior is starting to become offensive to you. What should you do?

A. Think before you act. John McKee, president of Four Windows No Walls Consulting, a consulting firm in Sedalia, Colo., says that although it is never acceptable for a boss to belittle employees, reacting emotionally can prompt you to do something you will regret. Continue reading